Courts of law have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status.

Courts of law have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status.

Courts of law have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status.

Courts of law, following two statutorily defined procedures, have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status. One procedure, a transfer hearing, is the process of moving a child to an adult status. The significance of this hearing is considerable, as it means that the former child may now be treated as an adult in all legal regards, including the administration of adult procedures and penalties (Mays & Winfree, 2012). Judges may make this decision after hearing the minor’s background, juvenile record, and willingness to get treatment in the juvenile justice system.

Student Questions to be answered

Is it appropriate for a child to be tried as an adult? What would be deemed as a crime suitable to alter a child age to be tried as an adult? Should the mental health of a child be taken into effect when choosing to pursue a transfer hearing?

Solution preview for the order on Courts of law have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status.

Courts of law have the legislated power to alter a youth’s legal status.

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